Canton Youth Soccer Association was founded in the 1980's by a group of parents interested in promoting the most popular sport in the world. Starting with a handful of children at is conception, Canton Youth Soccer now provides recreational, and travel
 
 
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HEADLINES  Subscribe to Canton Youth Soccer Association RSS news feed.
Season Kickoff Pool Party
07/25/2016
Save the Date!! August 19th, 8-10pm
Register Now for Pre-Season Soccer Fitness Program
06/26/2016
PLEASE REGISTER BY FRIDAY, JULY 29TH  FOR THE AUGUST PRE-SEASON...
Congratulations to the 2016 CYSA Scholarship Recipients!!
06/13/2016
The CANTON YOUTH SOCCER ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to seniors...
Pre-Season Challenger Camps
06/06/2016
Challenger Camps August 15th - 19th Memorial Field First Kicks...
CJSA New Heading & Concussion Policies
04/20/2016
CJSA (Connecticut Junior Soccer Association) has adopted...
Fall 2016 Registration NOW OPEN!!!
04/12/2016
Fall 2016:   Kclinic - for 4 year olds and kindergarten...
US Soccer Federation Youth Soccer Heat Stress Guidelines
04/12/2016
U.S. Soccer Federation Youth Soccer Heat Stress Guidelines Quick...
Concussion Awareness -
01/31/2016
Please review the player/parent concussion awareness form here.
 
Season Kickoff Pool Party

Save the Date!!

August 19th, 8-10pm


by posted 07/25/2016
Register Now for Pre-Season Soccer Fitness Program

PLEASE REGISTER BY FRIDAY, JULY 29TH 

FOR THE AUGUST PRE-SEASON FITNESS PROGRAM

 

We are excited to announce that Canton Youth Soccer Association has teamed up with Limitless PROformance to create a Pre-Season Soccer Fitness Program for our Travel and Farmington Valley League players.

Limitless PROformance is a locally owned and operated youth sports performance facility.  They have developed a soccer training program to give our athletes a competitive advantage.   They will offer 2 sessions this summer:

 

JULY Session:

  • Dates: July 6th, 13th, 20th, and 27th
  • Times:  6:00-7:30pm 
  • Location: Canton High School
  • Cost: $40 

AUGUST Session:

  • Dates: August 1st, 3rd, 5th, 8th, 10th, 12th
  • Times:  6:00-7:30pm 
  • Location: Canton High School
  • Cost: $60 

Cost if you register for BOTH SESSIONS at same time: $80 (Save $20)!!

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER NOW or visit the registration page at www.cantonsoccer.org

 

For any questions regarding registration for this program, please contact registrar@cantonsoccer.org 

To learn more about Limitless PROformance visit www.LimitlessPROformance.com  

 

Check out the Program Flyer and Program Description for additional information!

 

 


by posted 06/26/2016
Congratulations to the 2016 CYSA Scholarship Recipients!!

The CANTON YOUTH SOCCER ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to seniors who are currently involved with Canton Soccer and who came up through the ranks of the Canton Youth Soccer Association program.  The student athletes should demonstrate leadership on and off the field.  The students should also demonstrate high academic achievement and commitment to their community.

This year's recipients of the $500 scholarship are:

 

Rieley Hoffman - Varsity Captain, All-Conference and All-State for Fall 2015

 

Margaret Treacy - Varsity Captain, All-Conference for Fall 2015

 

Congratulations to both and best of wishes!!


by posted 06/13/2016
Pre-Season Challenger Camps

Challenger Camps August 15th - 19th

Memorial Field

First Kicks for ages 3-6 -- 9:00 to 10:00

Half-Day Camp for ages 6-14 -- 9:00 to 12:00

CYSA Team Training Camp for ages 8-15 -- 5:30 to 7:30


by posted 06/06/2016
CJSA New Heading & Concussion Policies

CJSA (Connecticut Junior Soccer Association) has adopted the US Soccer and US Youth Soccer recommendations regarding heading and the protocol for suspected concussions.   Compliance is mandatory for all CJSA members for all activities where CJSA insurance applies effective April 1, 2016.

This means that:

Heading Restrictions

       Players who are 10 and younger

  • No player who is 10 or younger may deliberately head the ball, regardless of the age group of the team they are playing on.  This includes all activities where CJSA insurance applies, such as practices, scrimmages, and competitions at all levels.    
  • No player on a U11 team or a combined team including the U11 Age Group, (e.g. U11/12), even if the player has turned 11, may head the ball deliberately.  

        This restriction will be enforced in competitions for teams U11 and younger (including combined age brackets including U11 and younger) by award of an indirect free kick for the opposing team.  Coaches and parents are responsible for applying this restriction for players who are 10 or younger and playing up.  
        
       Players who are 11-13.

  • Players who are age 11 to 13 and on teams for age groups U12 and older, are restricted to up to 30 minutes of practice heading the ball per week.  There is no restriction on the number of times these players can head the ball in a competition, unless the team is competing in a combined bracket that includes U11.  

Concussion Protocol

                Where a Health Care Professional (HCP) is Present at a Game or Practice
  • Any player who sustains a significant blow to the head or body, who complains about or is exhibiting symptoms consistent with having suffered a concussion or is otherwise suspected of having sustained a concussion, must be evaluated on the sideline by an on-site HCP engaged in this capacity for the competition who will perform applicable testing.
  • Any player suspected of suffering a concussion will not be allowed to return to play until he or she is cleared by the HCP.  Coaches, parents/guardians or players may not overrule the HCP.
  • If a coach seeks to allow a player to re-enter a game who has been removed from a game for a concussion assessment and who has not been cleared to return to play by the on-site HCP, the referee shall issue a warning to the coach.  If a coach persists in seeking to allow such player to re-enter the game after having been issued a warning, the referee may take other disciplinary measures against the coach as are permitted under the rules applicable to the competition.
  • Unless an HCP determined that the player has not suffered a concussion and clears the player to return to play, the player will not be permitted to return to practice or play until the player has successfully completed the return to play protocol and has been cleared to return to play by a Physician.   
 
Where a Health Care Professional Engaged for the Event is Not Present at a Game or Practice
  • Where a HCP engaged for the event is not present at a game or practice, any player who sustains a significant blow to the head or body, who complains about or is exhibiting symptoms consistent with having suffered a concussion or is otherwise suspected of having sustained a concussion, must be removed from play and evaluated by an HCP before the player will be allowed to return to practice or play. 
  • No coach shall permit a player who has been removed from a game for a concussion assessment to return to play until cleared to do so by an HCP. 
  • If a coach seeks to allow a player to re-enter a game who has been removed from a game for a concussion assessment and who has not been cleared to return to play by the on-site HCP, the referee shall issue a warning to the coach.  If a coach persists in seeking to allow such player to re-enter the game after having been issued a warning, the referee may take other disciplinary measures against the coach as are permitted under the rules applicable to the competition.
  • Unless an HCP determined that the player has not suffered a concussion and clears the player to return to play, the player will not be permitted to return to practice or play until the player has successfully completed the return to play protocol and has been cleared to return to play by a Physician.  

 
Definition of Health Care Professional
Health Care Professional (HCP) are licensed professionals such as an Athletic Trainer Certified (ATC) or Physician (MD/DO), with skills in emergency care, sports medicine injuries and experience related to concussion evaluation and management.
 
 
Compliance is mandatory for all CJSA members for all activities where CJSA insurance applies effective April 1, 2016.


by posted 04/20/2016
Fall 2016 Registration NOW OPEN!!!

Fall 2016:

 

 

Registration open!!  Click here to register.

  • MLS soccer for 1st and 2nd graders and some older kindergarten students who qualify.  
  • Recreational Farmington Valley League for 3rd thru 8th graders.
  • Travel League for 3rd thru 8th graders. (assessments for placement necessary)

 

Volunteers!!!!  We need you, if you would be willing to volunteer as a coach, assistant coach or team manager, please click here to register.

If you would like to join us as a part of our youth soccer board, please email us at president@cantonsoccer.org or vicepresident@cantonsoccer.org to learn more.  We would love to have you.


by posted 04/12/2016
US Soccer Federation Youth Soccer Heat Stress Guidelines

U.S. Soccer Federation

Youth Soccer Heat Stress Guidelines

Quick Tips for Parents, Coaches and Young Athletes

 

Youth soccer participation is at an all-time high, with nearly 14 million young athletes under the age of 18 playing soccer at elite and recreational levels in the United States'. To alert parents, coaches and young athletes about the dangers of dehydration and help prevent heat illness among young athletes, the U.S. Soccer Federation offers the following recommendations to parents, coaches and young soccer players.

 

It is important these groups follow these recommendations in light of recent heat illness incidents across a variety of sports and because children are more susceptible to heat illness than adults when active in hot, humid conditions.

 

G.O.A.L.

 

To help make the recommendations easy to remember, the U.S. Soccer Federation has developed the acronym G.O.A.L., which stands for:

 

  • Get acclimated - bodies need time to gradually adapt to increased exposure to high temperatures and humidity (especially young athletes).
  • On schedule drinking- Youth athletes should be encouraged to drink on a schedule before they become thirsty, and should drink before, during and after practice and games.
  • Always bring a sports drink- replacing electrolytes and providing energy is crucial to keeping kids safe and performing at their best.
  • Leam the signs - if someone becomes unusually fatigued, dizzy, and nauseous or has a headache during exercise in the heat, have them stop, rest and drink fluids.

 

YOUTH FLUID GUIDELINES

 

Before Activity

  • Young players should be well hydrated
    • You can insure young athletes are properly hydrated by checking the color of their urine.
    • Dark, apple-juice like urine indicates that you need more fluid, whereas light, lemonade like urine indicates good hydration status.
  • During Activity
    • Drink early - even slight dehydration can compromise performance and increase the risk for heat-related illnesses.
    • Young players should consume 5 to 9 ounces of fluid every 20 minutes while active.
    • Sports drinks like Gatorade are preferred to water because research shows a young athlete will drink 90% more and stay better hydrated.
    • Fluids with salt (sodium chloride), such as sports drinks, are also beneficial because they increase thirst and maintain voluntary ftuid intake and help replace sodium lost through sweat.
    • Keeping beverages cool at temperatures of 50 to 59 degrees is recommended.

 

Fluids to Avoid During Practice or Games

  • During active occasions, carbonated beverages, such as soft drinks, can reduce voluntary drinking due to stomach fullness and throat burn when gulping.
  • Caffeinated beverages have a mild diuretic effect and therefore could promote dehydration by increasing urine production during active occasions.
  • Energy drinks should be avoided because many contain caffeine and have a high carbohydrate concentration, which slows fluid absorption.
  • • Fruit juices can slow fluid absorption and cause upset stomach during activity.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SOCCER SAFETY IN THE HEAT

 

Acclimation is the Key

Help young players adjust to high temperatures and humidity by taking steps to acclimate them to the heat. Young athletes should have around 8 to 10 short exposures to the hotter conditions (at 45 to 60 minutes each) to acclimate sufficiently.

 

Avoid Unusually Hot Temperatures

If confronted with extreme temperature and humidity conditions, it's important to hold practices and games at cooler times in the day such as morning or dusk.

 

Make Fluids Part of the Game Plan

Before, during and after practice and games, be sure young athletes consume adequate amounts of fluid. Research shows a 6% carbohydrate sports drink, like Gatorade, can be absorbed as rapidly as water and can provide energy to help delay fatigue and improve performance.

 

Clothes Should be Cool

Children should wear clothing that is light-colored, lightweight and loose-fitting to keep cool.

 

Use the Shade

Parents and coaches should encourage young players to take breaks in shaded areas whenever possible especially during tournaments, multi-game and multi-practice days.

 

Know the Warning Signs of Dehydration

Dehydration during activity is a common problem and can place young athletes at risk for serious heat-related illness, such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke. That's why it's important to know the warning signs:

  • Noticeable Thirst • Headache
  • Decreased performance • Muscle cramping
  • Fatigue • Dark yellow urine (or no desire to urinate)
  • Weakness • Lightheaded feeling or dizziness
  • Nausea • Difficulty paying attention

 

If a young player becomes disoriented or unconscious, seek medical attention immediately.

 

Be Prepared for an Emergency

 

Always have a phone available and be familiar with emergency numbers. Keep ice and iced towels on hand in case of heat-related emergencies.


by posted 04/12/2016
Concussion Awareness -

Please review the player/parent concussion awareness form here.


by posted 01/31/2016
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